careers in Broadcasting

There're plenty of opportunities in front and  behind the mic.

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: The production manager assigns announcers, schedules studios, arranges recording sessions, produces commercials, and directs programs.

REQUIREMENTS: Anyone in production must have excellent organizational skills. The production director must understand the nature of broadcasting and bring new ideas to work every day.

ON AIR ANNOUNCER

WHAT THEY DO: Announcers are a radio station's "voice" and are often the people with whom the public identifies. This person introduces programs and music, reads commercial copy and public service announcements, and is involved in the overall public presentation of the station. At smaller stations, many announcer positions are part-time and duties overlap into other areas.

REQUIREMENTS: Excellent communications skills and the ability to think on your feet are obvious necessities in staying on-the-air. In today's digital world, even radio personnel need to know how social media works to promote your program and your station.

ASSIGNMENT EDITOR

WHAT THEY DO: An assignment editor is responsible for gathering bits of news and assigning reports to reporters in the newsroom. While creating a newscast is usually a team effort, assignment editors set news coverage priorities, organize the logistics of camera crews and reporters, and arrange for the various satellite feeds and live on-scene coverage.

REQUIREMENTS: This position is fairly skilled in terms of experience in a newsroom. Some stations may require specific educational background (i.e., a degree in journalism).

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