careers in Broadcasting

There're plenty of opportunities in front and  behind the mic.

RECEPTIONIST

WHAT THEY DO: The duties of the receptionist vary according to the size of the station. This position often is "the face" of a station and requires friendly personnel with a good understanding of all the aspects of how a station operates.

REQUIREMENTS: Many stations are willing to train their entry-level reception staff. Nonetheless, candidates should have completed high school, have phone system experience and be personable.

NEWS DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: The news director supervises the news department. An effective ND must understand budgeting, personnel management and the technical aspects of broadcasting. In addition to having a firm understanding of the community service role of broadcast journalism, he or she must also have solid news judgment - the ability to determine which stories are most informative and of the greatest value to the local broadcast consumer.

REQUIREMENTS: This is not an entry-level position and requires a good deal of experience, knowledge and education.

PROGRAM DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: In radio, program directors are generally responsible for more than a single station. They work closely with the entire on-air staff to develop exciting promotions that enhance the programs on the air. For TV, the programming manager is responsible for maintaining traffic logs, scheduling services, etc. The PD's programming objectives support the goals of the general manager and the general sales manager.

REQUIREMENTS: In order to coordinate various departments, this position generally goes to highly-experienced station personnel.

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