careers in Broadcasting

There're plenty of opportunities in front and  behind the mic.

ON AIR ANNOUNCER

WHAT THEY DO: Announcers are a radio station's "voice" and are often the people with whom the public identifies. This person introduces programs and music, reads commercial copy and public service announcements, and is involved in the overall public presentation of the station. At smaller stations, many announcer positions are part-time and duties overlap into other areas.

REQUIREMENTS: Excellent communications skills and the ability to think on your feet are obvious necessities in staying on-the-air. In today's digital world, even radio personnel need to know how social media works to promote your program and your station.

NEWS DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: The news director supervises the news department. An effective ND must understand budgeting, personnel management and the technical aspects of broadcasting. In addition to having a firm understanding of the community service role of broadcast journalism, he or she must also have solid news judgment - the ability to determine which stories are most informative and of the greatest value to the local broadcast consumer.

REQUIREMENTS: This is not an entry-level position and requires a good deal of experience, knowledge and education.

GENERAL SALES MANAGER

WHAT THEY DO: The person responsible for producing all advertising revenues for a station and for hiring, training and supervising the station's sales staff. The general sales manager must also be adept at understanding the business climate in the community and must have a strong knowledge of the interests of the station audience. Some stations have multiple levels of sales managers, including National, Regional and Local sales managers who focus on various aspects of sales.

REQUIREMENTS: Because of the managerial nature of this position, you must have, not only, proven sales skills, but also management experience.

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