careers in Broadcasting

There're plenty of opportunities in front and  behind the mic.

NEWS ANCHOR

WHAT THEY DO: News anchors are the most visible members of the news staff. These are the people that appear as the "up front" personalities on local newscasts. Ideally, the news anchor is a complete journalist, familiar with reporting, on-scene live coverage and skilled at writing, and in some cases, producing news packages.

REQUIREMENTS: While a degree in Mass Communications may not be specifically required to get your foot in the door at a station, a degree in broadcast journalism with serve you well to move toward an anchor position. You MUST have excellent written and verbal communications skills.

TRAFFIC DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: A station's traffic manager collects data from other departments in order to prepare a minute-by-minute schedule for the broadcast day. The traffic person is the daily link between the sales department and programming department, keeping up-to-date commercial time availability.

REQUIREMENTS: Many stations are willing to train their entry-level traffic/programming staff. Nonetheless, candidates should have completed high school, have broadcast experience and be very well-organized.

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: The production manager assigns announcers, schedules studios, arranges recording sessions, produces commercials, and directs programs.

REQUIREMENTS: Anyone in production must have excellent organizational skills. The production director must understand the nature of broadcasting and bring new ideas to work every day.

#GetHiredToday