careers in Broadcasting

There're plenty of opportunities in front and  behind the mic.

RECEPTIONIST

WHAT THEY DO: The duties of the receptionist vary according to the size of the station. This position often is "the face" of a station and requires friendly personnel with a good understanding of all the aspects of how a station operates.

REQUIREMENTS: Many stations are willing to train their entry-level reception staff. Nonetheless, candidates should have completed high school, have phone system experience and be personable.

MASTER CONTROL/VIDEOTAPE ENGINEER

WHAT THEY DO: Master Control Operators are responsible for operating the recording and playback equipment for live programs, managing commercial breaks in network, and playback of taped shows.

REQUIREMENTS: Many stations are willing to train their entry-level engineering staff to operate equipment. Nonetheless, there are trade schools across the country that provide training in electronic; in addition, the Society of Broadcast Engineers (SBE) has certification programs for each state.

DIRECTOR

WHAT THEY DO: The director of a newscast oversees and coordinates the activities of both the technical and onscreen aspects of a live television broadcast. Serves as producers for entire programs or for the production of portions of larger programs.

REQUIREMENTS: Working in fast-paced environments that are often hectic and stressful, a news director must be able to communicate welland think on their feet; that also requires that you're well-organized and can solve problems on the fly.

Most broadcasting directors hold bachelor's degrees in journalism, film production or communications. Such programs are offered at broadcasting schools, community or technical colleges and traditional four-year universities.

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